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Interceptors

An interceptor can add logic to clients, similar to the decorators or middleware you may have seen in other libraries. Interceptors may mutate the request and response, catch errors and retry/recover, emit logs, or do nearly anything else.

For a simple example, this interceptor logs all requests:

import {Interceptor, createConnectTransport} from "@bufbuild/connect-web";

const logger: Interceptor = (next) => async (req) => {
console.log(`sending message to ${req.url}`);
return await next(req);
};

createConnectTransport({
baseUrl: "https://demo.connect.build",
interceptors: [logger],
});

You can think of interceptors like a layered onion. A request initiated by a client goes through the outermost layer first. Each call to next() traverses to the next layer. In the center, the actual HTTP request is run by the transport. The response then comes back through all layers and is returned to the client. In the array of interceptors passed to the transport, the interceptor at the end of the array is applied first.

To intercept responses, we simply look at the return value of next():

const logger: Interceptor = (next) => async (req) => {
console.log(`sending message to ${req.url}`);
const res = await next(req);
if (!res.stream) {
console.log("message:", res.message);
}
return res;
};

The stream property of the response tells us whether this is a streaming response. A streaming response has not fully arrived yet when we intercept it — we have to wrap it to see individual messages:

const logger: Interceptor = (next) => async (req) => {
const res = await next(req);
if (res.stream) {
// to intercept streaming response messages, we override
// the read() method of the response
return {
...res,
async read() {
console.log("message received");
return await res.read();
}
}
}
return res;
};